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RE: Re: svn back-end question

From: Peter Yamamoto <peter.yamamoto_at_page44.com>
Date: 2005-01-20 19:35:52 CET

 
Windows can also have issues with directories with a large number of
files. While acting as a server I'm not sure of the consequences, but
for other direct operations, in my experience, this can be brutal.

The backup/repair/restore process for a StarTeam repository on a fairly
high end Windows server was brutal. I had to plan a whole weekend for
it. Some of this time was simply waiting for windows to respond to
opening a folder in windows explorer with a large number of files in it
(eg > 5minutes, sometimes > 15 minutes, sometimes hang completely [eg
more than the time to go out and eat and come back]).

Peter
-----Original Message-----
From: daniel@email.unc.edu [mailto:daniel@email.unc.edu]
Sent: Thursday, January 20, 2005 10:22 AM
To: users@subversion.tigris.org
Subject: Re: svn back-end question

Jean-Pierre,

I've only been using SVN for a few months and I haven't stressed it yet.
I will eventually have 200-300 users hitting one server. The problems I
am encountering have more to do with slow network performance in my
environment than anything subversion related.

A few things to think about:
1. You can change the type of back-end you use later by dumping and
restoring.
2. As a reformed CVS user myself, I found the fsfs repository more
useful while learning to use svn since I could directly examine the
files in the repository. It just makes is easier to understand what is
going on.
3. The one concern I have about fsfs is with the number of files in a
repository. I have conerns about what happens when there are many
thousands of revisions in a repository. Unix filesystems traditionally
do not handle that case very well (I'd like to see svn modified to use a
hierarchical fsfs repository - no more than 1000 files per directory).
4. The way I read the documentation it implies that the berkeley db
back-end will be deprecated at some future time. Some of the developers
(Ben) have recently said that this is not the case, but, nevertheless,
that's how I read it.

Best of luck,

Daniel

Quoting Jean-Pierre Sevigny <jpierre@zingy.com>:

>
> Hi!
>
> I'm currently looking at replacing our current CVS with Subversion.
>
> I have some concerns about using Berkeley DB as a back-end. I would
> like to ask what you think of it.
>
> 1) How stable is it, for a midsize company? (potentially 100+ users at

> the same time).
> 2) Would it be better to go to a flat-file back-end configuration?
> I've read the http://web.mit.edu/ghudson/info/fsfs article, and have
> some concern about the maturiry of such back-end.
>
> Thanks,
> Jean-Pierre
>
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Received on Thu Jan 20 19:38:16 2005

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