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Re: Help for checking out files on a network drive

From: Simon Large <simon.tortoisesvn_at_googlemail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Mar 2008 23:18:42 +0000

On 01/03/2008, Joe Contreras <jscontreras_at_cox.net> wrote:
> I'm not sure if this is where you post help for TortoiseSVN 1.4.2.

Yes it is, although we are now on 1.4.8

> I'm having issues setting up the checkout - checkin process for TortoiseSVN.
> My scenario.
>
> I have a code base in classic ASP that requires version control. I have SF
> Subversion as the repository and I'm using TortoiseSVN 1.4.2 as the client.

You mean the repository is on SourceForge, or you are using a
subversion downloaded from SF and installed on a local machine?

> The issue; we have a team that requires these files to be on a shared
> network drive everyone can check them out from the same drive and lock the
> necessary files and unlock them and commit them from this network drive.

Now you're really getting confused. You must distinguish between the
repository (the master database that stores all revision information)
and the working copy, otherwise known as a sandbox or developer
checkout.

Each developer should checkout their own working copy on their local
hard drive. Having a shared working copy is not a good idea at all and
*will* cause problems. You will find people overwriting each others
changes and you will lose all the protection benefits that version
control gives you.

> How do we do that using TortoiseSVN? My understanding is that everyone can
> checkout the entire repository and only if you are using that file do you
> need to lock it to avoid conflicts with other team members. Once I get this
> figured out we'll be up and running. I think this is a cool product and
> want to utilize it accordingly. I've used VSS in the past for version
> control however I've never used TortoiseSVN.

Subversion is not like VSS :-) In general you do not need to lock
files, unless you are binary files as opposed to plain text files. You
really should read at least the introductory sections of the
subversion book, and the TortoiseSVN manual/helpfile. These will
explain the underlying concepts, and both are quite readable.

Simon

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Received on 2008-03-02 00:18:48 CET

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